Savary 1910 Biplane: A footnote to an icon.

Robert Savary had accumulated a considerable experience by they time it presented his 1910 biplane. His second powered design -he had two previous failures with gliders-, it was a development and scaled-up version of the first one. Like the latter, it was a sort of Wright Flyer copy. More “Wright”, in fact: his 1910 biplane employed also Wright’s twin propellers driven by a single engine (60 hp ENV) configuration.
The biplane was shown at the 1910 Reims Meeting where it proved to be, like all Savary’s designs, a rather heavy contraction.

Photo take at the Meeting. Three examples were entered, but only the one flown by André Frey appeared, rather poorly. In this cute photo next to a real racehorse: the Blériot XI flown by Alfred Leblanc who took first place in the Gordon Bennett Trophy qualifications.

6 thoughts on “Savary 1910 Biplane: A footnote to an icon.

  1. It was two more years before “The Kings Of The Air,” P.O. Parmelee and Clifford Turpin, became the first men to fly in my city. To think, in 1910 the majority of people living had never even seen an airplane, let alone one that was flying!

  2. On a funny side note, last year I was talking to the artist David Uhl about his great painting entitled, The Need For Speed, http://daviduhl.fineartworld.com/artistViewingRoomCtl.php?imageid=3490&artistid=264&imagesPerPage=all& featuring a race between Lincoln Beachey , Barney Oldfield and the winner on his Harley board track racer, Don Johns. I told him how the add men got more and more grandiose with each race, and twords the end they were calling these matches, For The Championship Of The Universe!

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