Brown SC: Diamonds were not forever.

This bizarre aircraft was built in Missouri in 1931 and was the brainchild of a guy called Ben Brown. This pusher design was powered by a 95 hp Cirrus Mark III and had a “Bellanca-like” strutted tandem wing  with joined wingtips that form a sort of diamond-shaped wing. Ailerons on the wingtips and elevons on the forward wing, close to the fuselage.  It seems it was test flown, but no data is available about that or about its fate.

Boxy yet alluring.

Photo and main source of information: the great Aerofiles place.

Ricci R.4: Pensare in Grande.

The Ricci R.4 was a transatlantic double-hull quadriplane seaplane project which appeared just after the end of WW1. This huge catamaran was designed to be powered by eight engines of a nominal power of 5000 hp. The cabin, seen here between the two inner wings, has two levels able to carry around 155 passengers. It was  conceived to offer a luxurious service worthy of the great liners of the time.

Photo Source.

Lippisch Delta IM: Alpha of the Deltas.

Alexander Lippisch coined the name “Delta” and also had the honour of building the first practical delta wing aircraft. His Delta IM flew in 1931 as an evolution of his previous work on tailess gliders, and in particular as a powered version (30 hp Bristol Cherub III) of his Delta I. The result was both nimble and easy to handle as we can observe in this charming video. The only example built was destroyed in a 1933 crash, but the seed was already sown.

Photo: ©Alex Stocker.

Hawker “Spanish” Fury: Furiosamente bella.

Spain ordered three of these beauties in 1935. Compared to the RAF models, the Spanish Fury was fitted with a Dowty clean cantilever internally strung landing gear and was powered by a neatly cowled 700 hp Hispano-Suiza 12X Brs engine. The idea was to licence-built this updated model in Spain; enough to equip at least three squadrons. The outbreak of the bloody Guerra Civil ended all those plans. The three produced were shipped to Spain where they had service lives as convoluted as the Spanish conflict.

By the time this photo was taken (1936) the “Furia” was already obsolescent, but what a classic beauty.