Yakovlev UT-1: Resting Places (XII).

The ultra cute UT-1 was a decently aerobatic advanced single-seat trainer operated, mainly, by the Soviet AF’s VVS during the late 1930’s-early 1940’s period. Well-liked and sturdy, some of them even were hastily armed at the start of WW2, but that was only a temporary measure. The total of 1,241 produced were mainly employed as “military pilot makers”.

A suitably all-red painted example exhibited inside the incredible Vadim Zadorozhny’s Museum of Equipment, Arkhangelskoye (Moscow).

Polikarpov I-17 (TsKB-15): Art Deco in Red.

After his epoch-making I-16, Polikarpov was decided to achieve higher speeds with its next fighter project. In order to do that he chose the slicker water-cooled inline engine instead of the I-16 trusty air-cooled radial. The basic I-17 platform was similar to his previous rotund fighter, but thanks to the inline engine the fuselage cross-section was reduced to the minimum; quite similar to some “speed-seekers” of that era. First flown in September 1934, the design proved to be fast yet not promising enough. Only 3 prototypes were produce plus a few variants studies. Curiously this pretty things were though to be in service with the Soviet AF in early WW2 and were “shot down” in huge numbers by the Germans…

Magnificent 3-view drawing of the 1st prototype, the TsKB-15. With its imported 760hp Hispano-Suiza 12 Ybrs it attained a maximum speed of 455km/h.

MD-160 “Lun-Class” Ekranoplan: Resting Places (XI).

Weird scenes inside the USSR. The MD-160 Lun (Harrier in Russian) was an ekranoplan launched in the early 1980’s. With a load capacity of 91 metric tons, its main mission was anti-ship warfare. For that purpose the Lun mounted on its back six P-270 Moskit (SS-N-22 Sunburn) missiles. This massive aircraft ended as the only one of its kind, since the fall of the USSR and the budget cuts forced the program to be suspended in the middle 1990’s. Powered by eight Kuznetsov NK-87 turbofans, placed on its forward canards, the Lun was the fastest ekranoplan of its time with a maximum speed of 550 km/h. It surely wasn’t the prettiest…in conventional ways.

The unique MD-160 built rotting nicely in Kaspiysk, Russia. Look at the complexity of its bow lines. Trident included.

Sukhoi Jet Engine Powered Aircraft: We must begin somewhere.

This was Pavel Sukhoi’s OKB first attempt into the jet aircraft design. Conceived as a purely research aircraft in late 1942, this dandy artifact had an annular intake scoop placed the fuselage just behind its teardrop-shaped cockpit capsule. The nose section would have housed both the cockpit and a fuel tank, and was to be attached to the larger diameter central fuselage by four pylons. The central fuselage was to contain the “half-step” composite jet engine: a classic air-cooled engine -with an oil cooler- driving a pair of co-axial propellers was employed to supply compressed air to a sort of jet engine’s fuel injection/combustion chamber placed in the tapered tube. Complex enough?. The project never left the drawing board.

Very Soviet style artist’s impression of the subject. It could have been really something.