Erickson Aircraft Collection’s “Bf 109G-10”: Enough?

Few, if any, aircraft designs can treasure the assortment of engines the Bf 109 have carried through its various iterations:
– RR Kestrel in the first V1 prototype.
– Junkers Jumo 210 in the first series.
– DB 600 for the “pre-Emil”.
DB 601 and DB 605 for the main wartime variants.
– P&W Twin Wasp.
– BMW 801. Used, like the Twin Wasp, to test the possible radial conversion.
– RR Merlin in the Spanish Buchones.
– Junkers Jumo 211 in the awful Avia 199.
– Hispano-Suiza HS-89 for the early Spanish-built Messers.
– and last, but not the least, the Allison V-1710.

The Erickson Aircraft Collection’s airworthy “Bf 109G-10” seems at first sight to be the real deal or at least a DB-engined Buchón. Well, in fact it is indeed a Buchón, but in order to convert it to more closely resemble Bf 109G without the expense of a the original German engine they came to a brilliant idea. They decided to use an ubiquitous Allison V-1710 engine instead. To make this upright V12 engine looks like a inverted V12 both the engine mount and exhaust system have been specially designed so the cowlings almost mimic that of a late Bf 109G model. The result is quite convincing…and sure cheaper.

Never enough to me.

Lockheed SR-71A: Light My Fire (II).

The always, always, spectacular “Habu” putting a show….out of its natural envelope. They were usually the high point of Mildenhall Air Fetes. Pulling a few G more than “necessary” the J58 engines became deprived of the oxygen due to the dynamics of the inlets. Without oxygen but not without fuel; in fact quite a high quantity of fuel went inside the engine without ignition. That situation only needed the pilot to release the pressure on the joystick just a little. Almost instantly oxygen flowed again into the engine and they started to run again….but not smoothly at first. The quantity of fuel for the engine was at that moment way too much and these magnificent shooting flames resulted.